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The Wayward Women: Lauren Miller

Lauren Miller HS copyTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

LAUREN MILLER plays DOTARA, THE MAGISTRESS

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
LAUREN: Chicago?  We’re on an island.  Who ARE you?  Males have limited privileges here, but I do have some power in that regard…

Q: What can you tell us about The Magistress?
LAUREN: The Magistress is The Most Important Person in the entire show.  Why do you ask?

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN is set on the fictional Island of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other performances?
LAUREN
: This matriarchal thing is a total misunderstanding.  Our real problem is that we have zero diversity.  Men coming along occasionally is scant comfort in that regard.  And you can only imagine the issues that GLBT folks endure here, it is a quite a problem.  Of course staying in closets beats the hell out of standing behind curtains waiting to be stabbed, so I guess that’s something.

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite play? Character?
LAUREN
: Who’s that?  You mean that Willy??  Is he Jewish???  How old????

Q: Like many of Shakespeare’s advisers, the Magistress enjoys little control over others, and in fact (like some Poloniuses) often has a poor understanding of what’s going on. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
LAUREN: Oy, this control thing.  Working here is like having to herd cats, I have to tell you.  I should contact my union.

Q: Do you have a favorite line?
LAUREN: Yes.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?
LAUREN: Where’s the tequila? This is hard work.

Did we mention this play is performed in a Bar?

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Gilly Guire

1484091_647280595318248_821671476_nTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

GILLY GUIRE plays AQUILINE, THE SQUIRE

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
GILLY: I’ve been in Chicago just over a year and a half, since August of 2014, and I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of fabulous companies on an array of different styles. It has been the spice of life, man! Spice of life!

Q: What can you tell us about Aquiline, the squire?
GILLY: I would describe Aquiline as a young buck with the spirit and struggles of a New Year’s resolutioner. She’s full of vigor and expectation – for the world and for herself. I think her desire for truth makes her tick – and her desire to do the right thing (but she is caught between the myriad definitions of what that is from her society). I would liken it to our society’s array of definitions for “true manhood.” Amosa offers just as many suggestions for “true knighthood,” and I think our audience will be able to relate to Aquiline’s humanity and her desire for finding that truth once and for all.

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN takes place on the fictional isle of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other plays you’ve performed in? Does it affect your performance at all?
GILLY: I’ve not had much opportunity to explore reversed gender norms in play, and I feel lucky to be thrown into the thick of it with The Wayward Women. It has been an exceedingly satisfying experience. Hahah. Much fun!

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite Elizabethan play? Character?
GILLY: I’ve had the pleasure of taking the Unrehearsed Shakespeare workshop and have always been interested in ol’ Billy Shakes. I’ve only been in a couple Shakespeare productions and I adore me some sonnets, too.
Fave? Love me some Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing. Mmm. All that moxie, though.

Q: Aquiline is one of those rare individuals who strives for greatness and is frequently distracted from it, yet seems perfectly aware of her own failings. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
GILLY: Oh, indubitably. I feel like I continue to find parallels between Aquiline and myself – which is both exciting and sobering. 🙂

Q: Do you have a favorite line?
GILLY: Hard to choose just one! Of my lines it’s either “Avaunt, pisspole,” or “Thou Saturn tat, thou tale-bearing toad.” (Is that the bell? ‘Cause you just got schooled!).

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?
GILLY: Gilly Guire is Quill the Squire. Cheeky/freaky, is’t not?

Join us! Get cheeky! Get freaky!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2
Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Katy Jenkins

Jenkins HSTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

KATY JENKINS plays PINNE, THE SQUIRE

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
KATY: 
I’ve been in Chicago for just shy of three years now, following my graduation from college in May 2013. I am a troupe member of EDGE Theatre. I was most recently involved in a touring production of EDGE’s MacSith as Witch 1 and Ross. Light sabers and Shakespeare? Can’t go wrong there!

Q: What can you tell us about Pinne?
KATY: Pinne is a total sweetheart who gets constantly overlooked or put down because, as she says, “the greater people” make her nervous. Behind her socially awkward nature, there’s a really smart girl who sees everything and probably knows everybody’s secrets. She’s really very easy to like because she’s constantly looked down on and you just want her to win at something sometime. (She just wants to sing her song, okay?!) Everybody’s been there before, be it only a moment or two or a seemingly constant state. It feels good to cheer for the little underdog, to wish her strength. Pinne does show those smarts as the play goes on, so all is well! (She just wants to sing her song, though…)

Q: Pinne, arguably, has the clearest developmental arc in this play, going from a suppressed, socially inept introvert to an articulate, outspoken woman. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
KATY: Oh boy, do I relate to Pinne? Yes, yes, yes. I was very much like Pinne’s start-of-the-show self growing up, and still find myself there a bit too much for my liking. Finding yourself constantly on the outskirts of your society is disheartening to say the least. However, like Pinne, I found that a good friend or two can really bring out the best in you, even if that personal best isn’t easy to come by. End-of-show Pinne will be a good knight, when the time comes. She still has much more to learn, but she’s headed in the right direction. I like to think that’s the best place to be. Never forget that you can always learn more, but keep moving in the right direction.

Q: Favorite line?
KATY: My favorite little bit comes at the end of Aquiline’s speech at the end of 4.3: “I shall be more than ever that I’ve been / This Night’s no end: tonight my Life begins.” That speech is my favorite in the whole show, and that line’s my favorite of the speech! The favorite of the favorite!

Help Pinne Win! Check out

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: JD Whigham

JD Whigham - Headshot copyTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

JD WHIGHAM plays THE SWITZER

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
JD: I just moved to Chicago this past August from Oklahoma City, where I got my BFA at Oklahoma City University and did theatre and film around the city. I just finished up a reading of a new play called Father, Father at Voice of the City – we actually performed on the same day as the first read-through of The Wayward Women. I came up here to get into a bigger market for the acting and start on the next chapter of my life.

Q: What can you tell us about The Swiss Messenger?
JD: I think that there is a lot of comedy in him. In particular, I think it’s funny the way he swoops in and drops all of these big bombs with what seems to be a bit of a blasé attitude. He gets a bit wrapped up in his own words and, most notably, has a bad habit of burying the lead.

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite Elizabethan play? Character?
JD: While in school, I studied and worked with his plays as well as rehearsed and performed some in full. Outside of school, I worked with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park as an actor and fight choreographer, and I worked on a play of his with Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre. I don’t know that I’ve got a favorite play of his on paper – how in the world do you choose something like that?? – but I have always loved his wise-clowns like Touchstone and Feste. The quick-witted repartee and punning just brings me glee and I get a special joy seeing them work out cornerstone facts ages before the rest of the world finds out. Actually, Pinne is a great example of this.

Q: The Switzer, though a very expository role, also displays great confidence for a man of his rank, and seems perfectly comfortable both delivering long speeches and engaging in casual discourse with people of all stations. Do you relate to this character at all, or is he a complete stranger to you?
JD: I can see some of myself in the Switzer. I don’t feel reservation in communicating with people higher on the ladder than myself either. Now, of course, he must be able to communicate with people of all stations since that is his entire job, but he has a certain way of losing his way in explanation and having to regain his bearings in order to get to the point. This is something I can see in myself, as I’ll start making one point and by the end of speaking feel like I ended up somewhere else somehow.

Q: Favorite line?
JD: It has to be the terse explanation, “Thine Uncle was ever a man of appetite.” but there are plenty of gems.

Come on over and quench your appetite!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Amanda Carson

Carson HSTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

AMANDA CARSON plays THE DUCHESS, PENTI CELIA

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
AMANDA
: I have only been in Chicago since June of 2015, so I am fairly new. I have not worked with many companies here yet, but I have had a few lovely opportunities working on a web series and some sketch shows. Hoping to continue to network even more with the wonderful theatre community here in Chicago.

Q: What can you tell us about Penti Celia, the Duchess of Amosa?
AMANDA: The Duchess is, simply put, the baddest bitch in town. Haha, I mean, she is the ruler of Amosa, she has the highest rank, but she also has the difficult job of keeping her feisty knights in line. I think the Duchess exudes power through height – physical height and heightened language – because she has to contrast the physical power of the others. She is a dreamer, she is a romantic, she is confident, and I think the audience will like her ability to be the calm in the midst of chaos; however, she is not weak, for it takes a powerful person to command others through voice and demeanor alone.

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN is set on the fictional Island of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other performances?
AMANDA: This very much differs from other plays, being that it takes place in a matriarchal society! There is a combination of taking pride in the power and strength of women, and also of poking fun and the attitudes shown toward women in today’s society by making this obvious gender reversal. The result can be exaggerated at times, but I think it makes a humorous yet important commentary on the roles of men vs. women; many of the matriarchal themes come from stereotypical but true interactions and treatments in patriarchal societies. I feel a sense of safety playing a character who is indeed the ruler of this land, because I’m not fighting with men for power. The Duchess makes the rules, the Duchess uses her power for punishment and reward, without any permission from a husband or male counterpart, and that is an exciting opportunity for playing onstage and with other characters, both male and female.

Q: How much experience do you have with Elizabethan theater? Do you have a favorite play? Character?
AMANDA: I do not have a lot of experience with Shakespeare, aside from undergrad classes and scene/monologue studies. I have seen a fair amount of Shakespeare’s work performed, and I hope to keep growing in my knowledge and experience. My favorite Elizabethan/Jacobean play is ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore by John Ford, of which I saw an amazing production directed by Declan Donnellan at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2012. I enjoy many of Shakespeare’s works, some of my favorites being Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, and As You Like It.

Q: The Duchess is often the voice of reason in her scenes, and paradoxically is often ignored. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
AMANDA: I do relate to the Duchess, and I enjoy the challenge of finding a way to remain a leader in this strange world. I identify with her need for peace and structure, to her optimistic nature, and her fierce frustration when this outlook is challenged unnecessarily.

Q: Favorite line?
AMANDA:
“And song, O music, heartbeats of the Earth,
Give this to me before all other shows,
For it alone is closest to the Nature
Of our highest Hopes, our dreams, reaching out
Like th’ daring Sapling out the lowly soil
Of our baser atavism.”

Q: Anything more you’d like to add?
AMANDA: “Moon’s wounds!”

Reach out like the daring sapling! Join us!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

 

The Wayward Women: Jack Sharkey

12698545_10100285906019181_7267220118978617738_oTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

JACK SHARKEY plays CORDELIUS

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
JACK: Been in Chicago for seven years. Was on my way to Oregon but the axle broke, damn oxen died, then Rick and Morty got cholera. So I decided I’d hang my spurs here for a while. It’s been fun though. Gotten to work with bunch of great people at companies like DreamLogic, Bear Knuckle, E.D.G.E., and Unrehearsed Shakespeare. Once Wayward’s done I’m thinking about expanding my education by watching some reality television. Every time it’s on I hit mute and read a book.

Q: What can you tell us about Cordelius?
JACK: Cordelius is your best friend’s dog. Spending a day with him is great. Then you agree to watch him for a few weeks. He whines when left alone, keeps trying to squeeze between your legs, marks the entire house as his, and gives guilty looks that leave you going “What did he do this time?” So when your friend finally comes back it’s a huge relief. Still, when all’s said and done an afternoon in the park with him always sounds like a fun idea.

Q: How much experience do you have with Shakespeare? Do you have a favorite play? Character?
JACK: My grandfather gave me a paperback containing a couple of Shakespeare’s comedies including As You Like It, Midsummer, and Two Gents after I complained about being bored. It was that or go run off into the woods and frolic around. Ah the irony. Favorite Elizabethan play is Twelfth Night. I challenge anyone to do a production using that text that I won’t like. Favorite character is Hotspur from Henry IV Part I. Character’s a BAMF; tells the King of England to shove it sideways, throws down against an entire army after half his allies ditch him, and tells his wife how he’s going to make like Marvin Gaye with her in front of a bunch of royalty.

Q: Cordelius is, in some sense, a hopeless romantic who is very much out of his element (though he is handy with a sword). Do you relate to this character at all, or is he a complete stranger to you?
JACK: HA! Go back to 21-year-old me; there’d be a lot more similarities than differences twixt Cordelius and I. Granted I would’ve been prettier than him back then. Cordelius might have me beat now though. He’s aged better.

Q: Favorite line?
JACK: “’tis better to be pursued, by far I see, than to pursue.”

Persue Jack! ’tis far better! And watch him swoon!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2
Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Sarah Liz Bell

Sarah Bell HSTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

SARAH LIZ BELL plays DAME ANU

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
SARAH: “I just moved to Chicago in October after finishing my MA in Classical Acting at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA). I had a few friends in Chicago and wanted to keep those relationships going, so I came out here! I also felt, after visiting Chicago a few times through the years, that the Chicago Theatre Scene was very similar to London’s, which I fell in love with during my time there. You get the popular musicals and high-energy productions, but you also get the gritty, new, experimental works, and of course plenty of comedy, classics, and modern productions. There’s just so much here! It was the kind of work and community I knew I wanted to be a part of that brought me to Chicago.”

Q: What can you tell us about Dame Anu, the Black Knight?
SARAH: “Dame Anu is such an interesting character because of her clear contradictions. She is a valued Knight and skilled Fighter with very strict ideas about what is good and what is bad. She has very high morals and values honor and skill, but struggles so much with her own desires. I think she very much reflects a part of society that we still see today, where certain values are held high above others, simply for the fact that that’s the way it’s always been, not because they’re inherently right or wrong. Something like lust disgusts her, while killing someone for the sake of “honor” is a mere fact of life for her, and something she really makes a case for throughout the whole play. In a society that is recovering from a devastating war and attempting to move forward, Anu is very much archaic and stuck in the past, which makes for pure comedy when confronted with a new perspective—heads and swords will clash!”

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN is set on the fictional Island of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other performances?
SARAH: “Amosa and this play differ very much from previous performances! I’ve played gender-bent roles quite a few times, so being in a more powerful and commanding position as a character isn’t new to me. But in all those roles—no matter how much we talked in rehearsals about “well am I a woman playing a man, or is this character now a woman who just behaves like a man, or is this a society in which women behave like what we would consider manly?” etc.—never have I actually played a WOMAN who is just a WOMAN in a higher status position within society. It’s interesting, because after all those times of “playing men”, I automatically fall into the wide-stance-chest-out-stern-look-on-the-face posture, deepening my voice, and behaving generally “manly” with Dame Anu. But through rehearsals it’s been interesting to explore how a WOMAN who is skilled at fighting, fights; how a WOMAN who has seen war behaves when confronted; how a WOMAN who is considered of higher status than those of the opposite sex treat members of that sex; what WOMANHOOD means to this society and how that is similar or different to my own feelings or society’s views. The results the audience see may be similar to how I would perform if I were playing a role written for a man, but to come at it from a different perspective has been challenging—and fun!”

Q: How much experience do you have with Elizabethan theater? Do you have a favorite play? Character?
SARAH: “I actually haven’t performed in anything past the Restoration Period in almost two years—so yes, I’m familiar! Shakespeare quickly became my passion in college, and the reason I went to London for my Master’s is because there’s no better place to study the Bard! My favorite Elizabethan play would probably have to be King Henry VI Part 3—I LOVE the Histories! And my favorite Character is easily Queen Margaret of Anjou. I actually did my Senior Thesis on her in college! While I love Beatrice’s wit and Rosalind’s romanticism and poetry, Queen Margaret’s passion, determination, and general badass-ary just make my heart swell anytime I read or perform her words!”

Q: Dame Anu probably participates in more combat than any other character (both as victim and perpetrator). Do you relate at all to this character, or is she a complete stranger to you?
SARAH: “In some ways I relate and in others I don’t. I’m not much of a confrontational person myself—don’t get me wrong, if someone gets in my face I will say something, sure. But I mostly try to see the situation from the other person’s perspective rather than get in an argument or physical confrontation. Everyone’s got a story you know nothing about, so be kind always! But when it comes to swords…OH MAN I LOVE SWORDS. Stage Combat is definitely something I’m passionate about! I actually did my Master’s Thesis at LAMDA on discovering combat choreography through character analysis–it was fascinating and a lot of fun! So I guess you could say I relate to Anu in that I JUMP at the chance to play with swords and other weapons! WOO FIGHTS.”

Q: Favorite line?
SARAH: “This Distillery that ambleth as a Woman.” =D

Come see Sarah play with Swords!
THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2
Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Cast of The Wayward Women

THE WAYWARD WOMEN (OR: NOTHING TO DO)

CAST (in speaking order)

Jack Sharkey

Jack Sharkey as CORDELIUS

Adrian Garcia as JULIAN

Adrian Garcia as JULIAN

Nathan Ducker HS

Nathan Ducker as FLACHEL

Amanda Carson as THE DUCHESS

Amanda Carson as THE DUCHESS

Sarah Liz Bell as DAME ANU

Sarah Liz Bell as DAME ANU

Alexandra Boroff as DAME GRENDELA

Alexandra Boroff as DAME GRENDELA

Lauren Miller as THE MAGISTRESS

Lauren Miller as THE MAGISTRESS

Gilly Guire as AQUILINE

Gilly Guire as AQUILINE

Katy Jenkins as PINNE

Katy Jenkins as PINNE

JD Whigham as THE SWITZER

JD Whigham as THE SWITZER

The Wayward Women Auditions

Auditions for The Wayward Women have come and gone. Thank you kindly to everyone who came out to be seen and heard! Stay tuned for the cast announcement!

W3 Flag WW

Casting: Countess Bathory

COUNTESS BATHORY
An Elizabethan-style tragedy.

Crest 001

We Three is looking to cast a five-actor Ensemble for Countess Bathory.

Rehearsals start mid-April, 2016
TECH: June 6, 7, 8
PERFORMANCES: June 9, 10, 11, 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25 (7:30pm)

VENUE: 4001 N Ravenswood Ave, Ste 405 (The Right Brain Project’s space)
Rehearsals will also take place here.

Check out our 1-sheet for more information.

Ensemble members will portray various nobles, fighters, and servants, as well as play at least one speaking role in at least one scene. Speaking roles include:

Johnno, a serving man. (Combat experience a plus)
Anna Darvolya, Elizabeth’s servant and tutor. (Combat experience a plus)
Priest at Bathory’s wedding.
A Widow, a foreign charlatan.
Jane Maridova, a despoiled commoner, later a servant to Bathory. (Combat experience a plus)
Susanna, called “Susanna Wood-Seem,” a servant to Bathory (Combat experience a plus)
Two Hapsberg generals.
The Standard Bearer to Ferenc Nadasdy. (Combat experience a plus)
A Witch of the Woods. (Combat experience a plus)
Two Mercenaries in the Turkish army. (Combat experience required)
A Spy serving under the King.
Dorotta, a serving-girl.
Katalin, a young noblewoman.
A Captain of the Guard.

PAY: $50

TO APPLY: Please send an email entitled “Countess Bathory Ensemble” to Jared@WeThreePlays.com. Please include a Headshot and Resume in said email (preferably in a single pdf file)

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