We Three

Plays & Stuff

Archive for the category “Wayward Women”

The Wayward Women: Sin Boldly

12440819_10153345681056176_2306991114778338745_o

Dame Grendela (Alex Boroff) pontificates to ‘Dame Joanne’ (Adrian Garcia) and squire Aquiline (Gilly Guire)

Writing a consequence-free boozer is never easy for me (being a teetotaler), but I took some solace in Grendela’s strong, thinly-disguised hypocrisy. Though she paints herself as a blue-collar, salt-of-the-earth rogue, she makes a clear distinction between highborn and lowborn men (a distinction that she, in an added layer of hypocrisy, pretends to find irrelevant). She is a manipulative bully toward those weaker than herself, yet falls apart and plays the victim as soon as anyone stands up to her (not unlike a certain presidential candidate).

And I suppose, like Sir Toby Belch, Dame Grendela’s bacchanalian lifestyle is not totally without consequence, but you’ll have to come watch the show to learn what those consequences are.

However, just like real people, the drunken hypocrite Dame Grendela still has some valuable things to say. In 2.1, she admonishes her depressed and uncertain squire to never regret being punished for fun and folly: most people endure the same punishments for sinning much more conservatively, “but we will do contrition For Our Sins, and Not the Pondering of them.” Much like Martin Luther (another inspiring hypocrite), Dame Grendela tells us to sin boldly.

COSTUMES by Delena Bradley
LIGHTING by Benjamin Dionysus
PHOTO by INDie Grant Productions, LLC

The Wayward Women: Dame Anu’s Letter Soliloquy

12828359_10153341572891176_4113499621428059124_o

Dame Anu (Sarah Bell), Act 4 Scene 2

Dame Anu’s Letter Speech is an obvious homage to Malvolio’s Letter Speech in Twelfth Night. Although it has been “streamlined,” removing any interjections from other characters, and it lacks the perennially perplexing puzzler, “M.O.A.I.,” I think Anu’s letter still offers some food for thought. Forged by Dame Grendela (a female Sir Toby by-way-of Fluellen), the letter seems perfectly structured to gull Anu into revealing a side of herself she has hidden her entire life. Grendela, then, somehow possesses unique knowledge of exactly what Anu wants in a man, and precisely how she wants Cordelius to express those attributes. She even knows how to quell Anu’s concerns for her own reputation, and feigns a willingness to cooperate in her hypocrisy without actually calling it hypocrisy. It appears that Dame Grendela knows Anu better than she does herself, or even better than Grendela knows herself (based on some reactions we see to other speeches in the play).

Twelfth Night speaks a lot about holding in our desires, especially romantic desires, and how this can warp us. Nowhere is this more strongly paralleled in The Wayward Women than with the poor. proud Dame Anu.

COSTUMES by Delena Bradley
LIGHTING by Benjamin Dionysus
PHOTO by INDie Grant Productions, LLC

The Wayward Women: Quill’s Moon Speech

12841230_10153341572906176_4630350415265786734_o

Gilly Guire as Aquiline, Act 4, Scene 3 of The Wayward Women

Aquiline’s Moon Speech is a direct parallel of Prince Hal’s Sun Speech from Henry IV Part 1.
Hal’s speech always struck me as smug and superior; he seems to be insisting that it’s okay for him to fart around like these inferior folks because he knows he is above all that. He makes it sound deliberate, like he is intentionally ignoring his responsibilities so that he will be all the more impressive when he finally decides to do his job. The first time I read this, I immediately thought of Old Testament passages where a wrathful god visits horrors on an unsuspecting population specifically (and by his own admission) to show everyone how great he is. There have of course been performances where Hal seems more like he’s trying to convince himself of this rather than resting on the laurels that a historically-informed playwright has granted him, and it’s those interpretations that helped bring me to Quill and the Moon Speech. (The speech itself was suggested by Amy Harmon; I was too starstruck to refuse).
While Hal’s Sun Speech is an overt nod to one man’s ascension to take responsibility for his divinely-bestowed birthright, Quill’s Moon Speech (I hope) is more a contemplation of an entire generation that has been given no purpose nor guidance, told that the greatest generations came before them, and responds to this paralyzing criticism by deciding to find their own ways, no matter how many paths, mistakes, or identities that might require.
COSTUMES by Delena Bradley
LIGHTING by Benjamin Dionysus
PHOTO by INDie Grant Productions, LLC

The Wayward Women: Alexandra Boroff

Boroff HSTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens TONIGHT at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

ALEXANDRA BOROFF plays DAME GRENDELA

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
ALEXANDRA:
I have been in Chicago for 8.5 years now. I work with 2 companies more than anything else. The first is Unrehearsed Shakespeare where I am the Managing Director (performing As You Like It in late April!) and the second is EDGE Theatre, where I am the General Manager (gearing up for 1776 in September!).

Q: What can you tell us about Dame Grendela the Green?
ALEXANDRA: Dame Grendela is a loud, confident, aggressive Knight in Amosa. She feels that drinking, partying, and sleeping around improves her character and makes her a better warrior. You might compare her to Shakespeare’s Toby Belch or Falstaff. Try not to be offended by her lack of filter, but sit back and enjoy the ride!

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN takes place on the fictional isle of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other plays you’ve performed in? Does it affect your performance at all?
ALEXANDRA: I have not performed many roles based in a fictional matriarchal society, but I have had the great pleasure of playing some similar characters in Shakespeare during my work in Unrehearsed Shakespeare. In the past I’ve been able to play Toby Belch (from Twelfth Night) and Don Pedro (from Much Ado About Nothing). Also, in college, I was in a wonderful show called North Shore Fish by Israel Horowitz where I played a similarly blunt, loud, aggressive woman named Josie from north Boston. These characters absolutely inspire my take on Grendela. My work with Unrehearsed Shakespeare specifically taught me how to get the audience on my side and break through the 4th wall, and that is incredibly useful in this role!

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite Elizabethan play? Character?
ALEXANDRA: I studied Shakespeare a bit in high school and really fell in love with the plays in college. My favorite play is Twelfth Night. I have always said my favorite character was Maria, but I think in the past few years Toby Belch is coming in a close second. They lead with joy and don’t focus inward on the negative things in life. I love Shakespeare because it forces me to tell the story with both my voice and my body to get the message across to those unfamiliar with the plays. I love performing for people new to Shakespeare and seeing them fall in love with the stories with me!

Q: Dame Grendela is an expert warrior, boozer, and insulter. Do you relate at all to this character, or is she a complete stranger to you?
ALEXANDRA: I am an expert warrior, boozer, and insulter myself! Except, I don’t know how to fight, and don’t really drink that much. I insult with the best of them though. I’ve been told that I’m quite sarcastic and good at twisting people’s words for my own amusement, so I guess I have that in common with Grendela. I think what I relate to the most is her desire to tell stories. Grendela likes to paint pictures with her words and be the center of attention in the room. If that means taking stage physically or vocally, she’ll do it. I think I have the tendency to take over a room when I want to, be that a positive trait or not 🙂

Q: Do you have a favorite line?
ALEXANDRA: I have 2!
1) “Pray call me Pandemonium, name me satyr. Faunus in the flesh, for I will sport most ev’ry way it could be said.”
2) “..we will do contrition for our Sins and not the pondering of them.”

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with us! Ponder not!
THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Adrian Garcia

agheadshot2THE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

ADRIAN GARCIA plays JULIAN

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
ADRIAN
: I grew up in a small town called Crete, Illinois, about an hour south of here, and my father lived in the city during my formative years, so Chicago has always felt like home to me. I left Illinois in 2006 to attend college in New Hampshire, but came back soon after graduating in 2010. I’ve been living here since and working with a number of theater companies in both performance and educational positions.

Q: What can you tell us about Julian?
ADRIAN: Julian is the young servant to Cordelius. Fate has blessed him with good nature, a sharp wit, and a logical outlook on life; unfortunately he is trapped by his servitude. I think audiences will love Julian’s humor and cross-dressing. I don’t know if Julian sticks with Cordelius out of love, loyalty, or because he’s stuck in that position, but I think his willingness to jump into strange situations for his master is admirable.

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN is set on the fictional Island of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other performances?
ADRIAN: I’ve been in a number of plays with strong female characters, but none have ever had an entire world based on matriarchy. I think it’s great! I think it adds a fun level to my, and subsequently, Julian’s “performance” as Dame Joanne, to have to fit into this seemingly much different world.

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite play? Character?
ADRIAN: I’ve loved Shakespeare since my first reading of A Midsummer Night’s Dream in 7th grade and from the first time I saw one of his plays produced:  The Two Gentlemen of Verona at Chicago Shakes in 8th grade. One of my biggest thrills in college was studying acting at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art and seeing world-class theater–especially Shakespeare–performed. My favorite play is still Midsummer. I’ve seen it at Chicago Shakes, The Globe in London, and at Royal Shakespeare Theatre. I’ve been in it twice (as Mercutio and as Flute/Thisby). After having such great exposure to Shakespeare in England, classmates and I went on to create The Dartmouth Rude Mechanicals–Dartmouth College’s first and only student-run Shakespeare troupe, founded in 2008 and still going strong today. We would audition for each other, cast each other by blind vote, and we directed all of our shows cooperatively. In my mind, there is still nowhere as gorgeous as the BEMA for outdoor Shakespeare– a green clearing with a natural stone stage, hilly background, and surrounded by trees. I don’t know if I have a favorite character, but Mercutio, Bottom, and Feste are definitely up there.

Q: Julian spends much of the play pretending to be higher-status than he really is, yet still doesn’t seem to derive much power from this. Do you relate to this character at all, or is he a complete stranger to you?
ADRIAN: I think a lot of people, myself included, can relate to the feeling of being smarter than whoever is giving the orders. Lots of people know better, but can’t do better because of their position In life. For me, Julian has the potential to be a miserably downtrodden character, but he tries to be optimistic even as nothing goes his way. I can relate to that a little bit, and at the least I find it an admirable quality that I would like to have in my own life.

Q: Favorite line?
ADRIAN: My favorite line, to paraphrase, is when Dame Anu calls Dame Grendela “This distillery that ambleth as a woman.” I’m not sure why, but that line absolutely tickles me.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?
ADRIAN: I’m very excited to be a part of this production. It’s a rare treat to have such complex and beautiful language to play with in a play written recently. I’m thrilled to share that with an audience. Like a Shakespeare show, I expect no one in the audience will catch every joke, every reference, and every turn of phrase Jared has sprinkled into this poetic and dense piece; however, I have all the faith in the world that our very talented cast will bring it to life well enough to be enjoyed by everyone.

Come! Let us tickle you!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Lauren Miller

Lauren Miller HS copyTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

LAUREN MILLER plays DOTARA, THE MAGISTRESS

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
LAUREN: Chicago?  We’re on an island.  Who ARE you?  Males have limited privileges here, but I do have some power in that regard…

Q: What can you tell us about The Magistress?
LAUREN: The Magistress is The Most Important Person in the entire show.  Why do you ask?

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN is set on the fictional Island of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other performances?
LAUREN
: This matriarchal thing is a total misunderstanding.  Our real problem is that we have zero diversity.  Men coming along occasionally is scant comfort in that regard.  And you can only imagine the issues that GLBT folks endure here, it is a quite a problem.  Of course staying in closets beats the hell out of standing behind curtains waiting to be stabbed, so I guess that’s something.

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite play? Character?
LAUREN
: Who’s that?  You mean that Willy??  Is he Jewish???  How old????

Q: Like many of Shakespeare’s advisers, the Magistress enjoys little control over others, and in fact (like some Poloniuses) often has a poor understanding of what’s going on. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
LAUREN: Oy, this control thing.  Working here is like having to herd cats, I have to tell you.  I should contact my union.

Q: Do you have a favorite line?
LAUREN: Yes.

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?
LAUREN: Where’s the tequila? This is hard work.

Did we mention this play is performed in a Bar?

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Gilly Guire

1484091_647280595318248_821671476_nTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

GILLY GUIRE plays AQUILINE, THE SQUIRE

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
GILLY: I’ve been in Chicago just over a year and a half, since August of 2014, and I have had the pleasure of working with a variety of fabulous companies on an array of different styles. It has been the spice of life, man! Spice of life!

Q: What can you tell us about Aquiline, the squire?
GILLY: I would describe Aquiline as a young buck with the spirit and struggles of a New Year’s resolutioner. She’s full of vigor and expectation – for the world and for herself. I think her desire for truth makes her tick – and her desire to do the right thing (but she is caught between the myriad definitions of what that is from her society). I would liken it to our society’s array of definitions for “true manhood.” Amosa offers just as many suggestions for “true knighthood,” and I think our audience will be able to relate to Aquiline’s humanity and her desire for finding that truth once and for all.

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN takes place on the fictional isle of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other plays you’ve performed in? Does it affect your performance at all?
GILLY: I’ve not had much opportunity to explore reversed gender norms in play, and I feel lucky to be thrown into the thick of it with The Wayward Women. It has been an exceedingly satisfying experience. Hahah. Much fun!

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite Elizabethan play? Character?
GILLY: I’ve had the pleasure of taking the Unrehearsed Shakespeare workshop and have always been interested in ol’ Billy Shakes. I’ve only been in a couple Shakespeare productions and I adore me some sonnets, too.
Fave? Love me some Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing. Mmm. All that moxie, though.

Q: Aquiline is one of those rare individuals who strives for greatness and is frequently distracted from it, yet seems perfectly aware of her own failings. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
GILLY: Oh, indubitably. I feel like I continue to find parallels between Aquiline and myself – which is both exciting and sobering. 🙂

Q: Do you have a favorite line?
GILLY: Hard to choose just one! Of my lines it’s either “Avaunt, pisspole,” or “Thou Saturn tat, thou tale-bearing toad.” (Is that the bell? ‘Cause you just got schooled!).

Q: Anything else you’d like to add?
GILLY: Gilly Guire is Quill the Squire. Cheeky/freaky, is’t not?

Join us! Get cheeky! Get freaky!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2
Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Katy Jenkins

Jenkins HSTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

KATY JENKINS plays PINNE, THE SQUIRE

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
KATY: 
I’ve been in Chicago for just shy of three years now, following my graduation from college in May 2013. I am a troupe member of EDGE Theatre. I was most recently involved in a touring production of EDGE’s MacSith as Witch 1 and Ross. Light sabers and Shakespeare? Can’t go wrong there!

Q: What can you tell us about Pinne?
KATY: Pinne is a total sweetheart who gets constantly overlooked or put down because, as she says, “the greater people” make her nervous. Behind her socially awkward nature, there’s a really smart girl who sees everything and probably knows everybody’s secrets. She’s really very easy to like because she’s constantly looked down on and you just want her to win at something sometime. (She just wants to sing her song, okay?!) Everybody’s been there before, be it only a moment or two or a seemingly constant state. It feels good to cheer for the little underdog, to wish her strength. Pinne does show those smarts as the play goes on, so all is well! (She just wants to sing her song, though…)

Q: Pinne, arguably, has the clearest developmental arc in this play, going from a suppressed, socially inept introvert to an articulate, outspoken woman. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
KATY: Oh boy, do I relate to Pinne? Yes, yes, yes. I was very much like Pinne’s start-of-the-show self growing up, and still find myself there a bit too much for my liking. Finding yourself constantly on the outskirts of your society is disheartening to say the least. However, like Pinne, I found that a good friend or two can really bring out the best in you, even if that personal best isn’t easy to come by. End-of-show Pinne will be a good knight, when the time comes. She still has much more to learn, but she’s headed in the right direction. I like to think that’s the best place to be. Never forget that you can always learn more, but keep moving in the right direction.

Q: Favorite line?
KATY: My favorite little bit comes at the end of Aquiline’s speech at the end of 4.3: “I shall be more than ever that I’ve been / This Night’s no end: tonight my Life begins.” That speech is my favorite in the whole show, and that line’s my favorite of the speech! The favorite of the favorite!

Help Pinne Win! Check out

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: JD Whigham

JD Whigham - Headshot copyTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

JD WHIGHAM plays THE SWITZER

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
JD: I just moved to Chicago this past August from Oklahoma City, where I got my BFA at Oklahoma City University and did theatre and film around the city. I just finished up a reading of a new play called Father, Father at Voice of the City – we actually performed on the same day as the first read-through of The Wayward Women. I came up here to get into a bigger market for the acting and start on the next chapter of my life.

Q: What can you tell us about The Swiss Messenger?
JD: I think that there is a lot of comedy in him. In particular, I think it’s funny the way he swoops in and drops all of these big bombs with what seems to be a bit of a blasé attitude. He gets a bit wrapped up in his own words and, most notably, has a bad habit of burying the lead.

Q: What experience do you have with Shakespeare? Have you got a favorite Elizabethan play? Character?
JD: While in school, I studied and worked with his plays as well as rehearsed and performed some in full. Outside of school, I worked with Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park as an actor and fight choreographer, and I worked on a play of his with Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre. I don’t know that I’ve got a favorite play of his on paper – how in the world do you choose something like that?? – but I have always loved his wise-clowns like Touchstone and Feste. The quick-witted repartee and punning just brings me glee and I get a special joy seeing them work out cornerstone facts ages before the rest of the world finds out. Actually, Pinne is a great example of this.

Q: The Switzer, though a very expository role, also displays great confidence for a man of his rank, and seems perfectly comfortable both delivering long speeches and engaging in casual discourse with people of all stations. Do you relate to this character at all, or is he a complete stranger to you?
JD: I can see some of myself in the Switzer. I don’t feel reservation in communicating with people higher on the ladder than myself either. Now, of course, he must be able to communicate with people of all stations since that is his entire job, but he has a certain way of losing his way in explanation and having to regain his bearings in order to get to the point. This is something I can see in myself, as I’ll start making one point and by the end of speaking feel like I ended up somewhere else somehow.

Q: Favorite line?
JD: It has to be the terse explanation, “Thine Uncle was ever a man of appetite.” but there are plenty of gems.

Come on over and quench your appetite!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

The Wayward Women: Amanda Carson

Carson HSTHE WAYWARD WOMEN opens March 17 at Mary’s Attic (5400 N Clark St)

AMANDA CARSON plays THE DUCHESS, PENTI CELIA

Q: How long have you been in Chicago?
AMANDA
: I have only been in Chicago since June of 2015, so I am fairly new. I have not worked with many companies here yet, but I have had a few lovely opportunities working on a web series and some sketch shows. Hoping to continue to network even more with the wonderful theatre community here in Chicago.

Q: What can you tell us about Penti Celia, the Duchess of Amosa?
AMANDA: The Duchess is, simply put, the baddest bitch in town. Haha, I mean, she is the ruler of Amosa, she has the highest rank, but she also has the difficult job of keeping her feisty knights in line. I think the Duchess exudes power through height – physical height and heightened language – because she has to contrast the physical power of the others. She is a dreamer, she is a romantic, she is confident, and I think the audience will like her ability to be the calm in the midst of chaos; however, she is not weak, for it takes a powerful person to command others through voice and demeanor alone.

Q: THE WAYWARD WOMEN is set on the fictional Island of Amosa, a matriarchal society. Does this differ much from other performances?
AMANDA: This very much differs from other plays, being that it takes place in a matriarchal society! There is a combination of taking pride in the power and strength of women, and also of poking fun and the attitudes shown toward women in today’s society by making this obvious gender reversal. The result can be exaggerated at times, but I think it makes a humorous yet important commentary on the roles of men vs. women; many of the matriarchal themes come from stereotypical but true interactions and treatments in patriarchal societies. I feel a sense of safety playing a character who is indeed the ruler of this land, because I’m not fighting with men for power. The Duchess makes the rules, the Duchess uses her power for punishment and reward, without any permission from a husband or male counterpart, and that is an exciting opportunity for playing onstage and with other characters, both male and female.

Q: How much experience do you have with Elizabethan theater? Do you have a favorite play? Character?
AMANDA: I do not have a lot of experience with Shakespeare, aside from undergrad classes and scene/monologue studies. I have seen a fair amount of Shakespeare’s work performed, and I hope to keep growing in my knowledge and experience. My favorite Elizabethan/Jacobean play is ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore by John Ford, of which I saw an amazing production directed by Declan Donnellan at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2012. I enjoy many of Shakespeare’s works, some of my favorites being Much Ado About Nothing, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, and As You Like It.

Q: The Duchess is often the voice of reason in her scenes, and paradoxically is often ignored. Do you relate to this character at all, or is she a complete stranger to you?
AMANDA: I do relate to the Duchess, and I enjoy the challenge of finding a way to remain a leader in this strange world. I identify with her need for peace and structure, to her optimistic nature, and her fierce frustration when this outlook is challenged unnecessarily.

Q: Favorite line?
AMANDA:
“And song, O music, heartbeats of the Earth,
Give this to me before all other shows,
For it alone is closest to the Nature
Of our highest Hopes, our dreams, reaching out
Like th’ daring Sapling out the lowly soil
Of our baser atavism.”

Q: Anything more you’d like to add?
AMANDA: “Moon’s wounds!”

Reach out like the daring sapling! Join us!

THE WAYWARD WOMEN
March 17 – April 2

Thursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays
7:00pm
Mary’s Attic, 5400 N Clark Street
$3 at the Door

 

Post Navigation